August 15, 2012

Solo: A Memoir of Hope by Hope Solo

There is much to be said about this outspoken goal keeper for the US Women’s National Team. Some people will describe her as selfish, some as too outgoing. People say she needs to keep her comments to herself. To me, she is an amazing goal keeper who says the things many people think, but are too afraid to say, and doesn’t care what the media says about her. Why should she? She is an Olympic gold medalist – more than once, and the greatest goal keeper in the world. In her autobiography, you, as the reader, gain an insight into what made Hope into the person she is today.

When you think of star athletes, you think of fame, fortune maybe, and having a life where everyone looks up to you. For Hope, the story did not go that way. She has had to face much adversity to get to the place she is today.

Her books takes you through stories about her personal family life, some of which could be really hard to share with people. Especially knowing the media hasn’t always been on your side – there will always be critics. The stories are filled with emotion, and gives you a pretty good insight into the type of person she is, which does not include selfish.

There aren’t many good ways to critique an autobiography, you can’t judge the story, because it is all real. But, the writing in this book was full of intelligence and class. Hope has faced many issues with her team and with the media, she explains how every one of those events came about. She may not apologize for everything she says, which she shouldn’t, but she gives her perspective on the situations and makes you realize that the media does, in fact, blow things up in order to get a good story.

It will have you crying one minute, then laughing the next. I guarantee, if you ever had a negative opinion about Hope, your mind will instantly be changed after reading this emotion-filled memoir.

5/5 stars. Beautifully written, and had me hooked from the very first page.



Read ahead for spoilers
The stories that shook me the most were the stories about her child hood dog dying and also her father dying.

The story about the women’s world cup in 2007 had me very worked up. I thought she was treated unfairly by her team and coach, and was happy when I read that he was fired.

4 comments:

  1. Hi, Courtney!
    My daughter loves Hope Solo. Would you say this book is okay for an 11-year-old to read?
    Thanks,
    Bart

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hey Bart!
    Thank you for reading! As for an 11-year-old reading this, I would say its up to the parent. I don't know if you're much of a reader or a Hope fan. But if you are, I would say preview it. There is use of some language that most parents wouldn't want their child to use. And talk of abuse. All children are different. Some can handle it. Some can't so here is my suggestion. You could pick up a copy and read it, or have another adult close to your child read it, OR! This might be your best option, there IS a youth reader's version that she came out with because of the strong subjects matters as well as language. I, personally, have not read it (which i probably should and put a review up for other people who think like you!) so I don't know how much different the story is. But the book will always be available when she is older.
    Here is a link to the young reader's addition that i was talking about
    http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/hope-solo-hope-solo/1110781127?ean=9780062220653
    This will probably be your best bet since she is only 11.
    Again, Thank you for reading! And I hope your daughter enjoys the book!
    -Courtney

    ReplyDelete
  3. i agree courtney!! I was in 6th grade when the 2007 world cup happened and i just started watching soccer then. So i dont really know how things really played out. I love Hope and this gave me a different perspective of abby wambach too!! overall great read

    ReplyDelete